Montana Department of Environmental Quality About Us Permitting & Operator Assistance Public Participation

Engineering Infrastructure & Subdivisions

Program Overview

The process of dividing land into parcels is a necessary and important function in the growth of a community. When, where, and how development occurs establishes land division patterns for the community that will last for generations.


Subdivision Review

The DEQ Subdivision Program reviews divisions of land comprising less than 20 acres, as well as condominiums and recreational camping vehicle and mobile home parks, regardless of the size of the parcel where they are located. This review is limited to sanitation facilities, including the water supply, sewage disposal, solid waste disposal, and storm drainage systems.

Subdivisions are reviewed prior to creating the parcels to assure that adequate sanitation facilities can be constructed, operated, and maintained to support each parcel. Planning ahead for proper design and location of the facilities helps protect both our surface and ground water in Montana.

Design manuals have been developed to provide standards for wastewater treatment systems, water supply development, and storm drainage systems. The regulations also set out minimum separation distances between water supply sources and potential contamination sources such as wastewater treatment systems, surface waters, and floodplains.

The regulations and subdivision review are structured to prevent pollution problems through the proper design, location, operation, and maintenance of sanitation facilities.


System Design and Construction

DEQ assists communities with constructing and maintaining wastewater and drinking water infrastructure that provides safe drinking water and produces effluent that protects human health and the environment. DEQ’s engineering staff review plans and specifications for new public water and wastewater systems or requests to modify existing systems to ensure compliance with Design Standards. DEQ is also the administrating agency for the State Revolving Fund Loan Programs that provide below market interest loans for eligible wastewater, drinking water, and nonpoint source pollution projects.

Contacts

Subdivisions and Engineering Program Contacts

Bureau Chief
Kevin Smith (406) 444-1277

Program Support Specialist
Candice Gernand (406) 444-4643

Program Support Specialist
Leata English (406) 444-4224


Drinking Water State Revolving Fund

Section Supervisor
Mark Smith (406) 444-5325

Water Pollution Control State Revolving Fund

Section Supervisor
Mike Abrahamson (406) 444-6776

Public Water Supply and Subdivision Review

Section Supervisor
Margarite Juarez Thomas (406) 755-8956


Subdivision Review Fee Calculation - Effective March 1, 2020

Note:

Before DEQ Subdivision approval can be finalized (allowing you to move forward with your project), you must first obtain a water right or have a letter provided by the Department of Natural Resources & Conservation indicating that your usage does not require a beneficial water use permit. For instructions on requesting a determination by DNRC regarding water right requirements visit: DNRC Water Right Inquiry Instructions

 

DEQ/Local Government Joint Application Form

Checklists and Calculations

DEQ Circulars and Regulations

Nondegradation Determination

Municipal Facilities Exclusion

Subdivision Stormwater Design Criteria and Resources

The public water and wastewater engineering review program reviews plans and specifications for new systems and alterations to existing systems. Approval from DEQ is required to construct, alter or extend a public sewer system serving 15 or more families or 25 or more persons daily for any 60 or more days in a calendar year.

  1. Prior to operating, constructing, altering or extending a public water supply, the applicant must submit an engineering report along with the necessary plans and specifications to DEQ or a delegated division of local government for review and written approval.
  2. The engineering report, plans, and specifications for a community public water supply must be prepared and designed by a professional engineer according to specific engineering criteria. An engineer may be required to prepare plans and specifications for a noncommunity public water supply when the complexity of the proposed system warrants that level of involvement by an engineer.
  3. The applicant must identify the legal entity responsible for the ownership, operation, maintenance, and perpetuation of the public water supply system. If a change of ownership occurs, DEQ must receive written notice within 30 days.
  4. The department has 60 days to approve, approve with conditions, deny the application, or to request more information. The DEQ or a delegated division of local government will issue a written approval for a public water supply system if it determines that the design report, plans, and specifications are complete and the applicant has complied with department rules.
  5. If construction, alteration, or extension of the community public water supply system has not been completed within three years after approval, the applicant must resubmit all of the information required in items one through three above.
  6. Within 90 days after the construction, alteration, or extension of the public water supply system, the project engineer must certify to DEQ that the required work was completed according to the approved plans and specifications.

Plan Review Fee Record Design Criteria


Forms and Checklists

Water/Sewer Main and Water Supply Well Checklists


The Montana Legislature established two State Revolving Fund (SRF) Loan Programs - one for water pollution control projects (wastewater and non-point source projects) and the other for drinking water projects. Both programs provide at or below market interest rate loans to eligible Montana entities.

Drinking Water Project Funding

The Drinking Water State Revolving Fund (DWSRF) program is a federal-state partnership to help ensure safe drinking water. The program provides financial support to water systems and to state safe water programs.

Types of Financial Assistance:

Types of assistance currently provided are direct loans and purchase or refinancing of existing

Financial Requirements:

  • Financial capability to properly operate the system and to repay the loan
  • Loan secured by a Bond or Note
  • Different bonding & security options exist (Revenue, general obligation, SID, RSID, tax increment)
  • Revenue Bond requires debt service reserve and coverage of 110%.
  • Maintain financial records

Terms:

The current interest rate is 2.5 percent with payment schedules not to exceed 20 years. Drinking Water Projects qualifying as disadvantaged may extend term up to 30 years.

Funds Available:

The SRF loan programs are designed to provide a perpetual source of financial assistance to Montana communities.


Waste Water Project Funding

The Water Pollution Control State Revolving Fund (WPCSRF) Program was established for water pollution control projects. The program provides at or below market interest rate loans to eligible Montana entities.

Examples of Eligible Water Quality Projects

Wastewater Projects:

  • Wastewater treatment plant improvements
  • Interceptors, collectors, and lift stations
  • Lagoon construction & rehabilitation
  • Engineering & project inspection
  • Land used for disposal purposes

Non-Point Source Projects:

  • Agricultural BMPs
  • Urban storm water /construction runoff
  • Animal feed operations (AFOs)
  • Wetlands/Stream bank restoration
  • Underground storage tanks
  • Septic system removal or upgrade

Types of Financial Assistance

Types of assistance currently provided are: direct loans and purchase or refinancing of existing debt.

Financial Requirements

  • Financial capability to properly operate the system and to repay the loan
  • Loan secured by a Bond or Note
  • Different bonding & security options exist (Revenue, general obligation, SID, RSID, tax increment)
  • Revenue Bond requires debt service reserve and coverage of 110 percent
  • Maintain financial records

Terms:

The current interest rate is 2.5 percent with payment schedules not to exceed 30 years for certain projects.

Funds Available:

The SRF loan programs are designed to provide a perpetual source of financial assistance to Montana communities.


How to Apply

To begin the application process, all entities must request that their project(s) be added to the Priority List contained in the Intended Use Plan. Early notification by the applicant is essential to get on the priority list and a project remains on the list until it has been completed regardless of the funding source(s) used to finance the project. This annual process begins in the Spring to identify projects which may need SRF funding for their project in the upcoming year.

The WPCSRF Survey Form or the DWSRF Survey Form is required to be placed on the Project Priority List. Please COMPLETE and submit to DEQ Engineering Bureau with supporting information.

Once ready to begin the project, applicants must submit the Uniform Application Form For Montana Public Facility Projects to request SRF loan funding. These applications are accepted year round. After the application is evaluated and approved, funds can be committed to a project. The SRF loan program cooperates with the other funding programs to ensure project funding is available when it is needed.

Loans will be offered on a first-come basis until the demand exceed the available funds. Lower ranked projects may be funded before higher ranked projects (if the higher ranked project is not ready to proceed) as long as the funds are available. Ranking on the priority list is based on water quality and/or public health impacts and financial needs.

Additional Financial Assistance Programs for Water, Wastewater, and Solid Waste Projects

Intended Use Plans and Project Priority List

2022 Intended Use Plans and Project Priority Lists

Drinking Water | 2022 Intended Use Plan and Project Priority List (Final)
Water Pollution Control | 2022 Intended Use Plan and Project Priority List (Final)

2021 Intended Use Plans and Project Priority Lists

Drinking Water | 2021 Intended Use Plan and Project Priority List (Final)
Water Pollution Control | 2021 Intended Use Plan and Project Priority List (Final)

2020 Intended Use Plans and Project Priority Lists

Drinking Water | 2020 Intended Use Plan and Project Priority List (Final)
Water Pollution Control | 2020 Intended Use Plan and Project Priority List (Final)

2019 Intended Use Plans and Project Priority Lists

Drinking Water | 2019 Intended Use Plan and Project Priority List (Final)
Water Pollution Control | 2019 Intended Use Plan and Project Priority List (Final)

2018 Intended Use Plans and Project Priority Lists

Drinking Water | 2018 Intended Use Plan and Project Priority List (Final)
Water Pollution Control | 2018 Intended Use Plan and Project Priority List (Final)

2017 Intended Use Plans and Project Priority Lists

Drinking Water | 2017 Intended Use Plan and Project Priority List (Final)
Water Pollution Control | 2017 Intended Use Plan and Project Priority List (Final)


Reports